CHARD NEWS: People get to learn more about lifesaving defibs

CHARD NEWS: People get to learn more about lifesaving defibs

MEMBERS of the voluntary Chard Defibrillator Group have been meeting with people to show them how the piece of medical equipment could save somebody’s life.

The group has worked hard to finance the buying of three public defibrillators which can be used on somebody in the event of a heart attack.

The defibrillators have yet to arrive in Chard, but it is expected that they will be placed in strategic places in and around the town centre and be available to be used 24-hours a day.

The group was at the Guildhall in Chard on Saturday (March 31, 2018) where it was raising money and explaining to people about the importance of the defibrillators.

The Mayor of Chard, Cllr Garry Shortland, who was hosting an Easter fair at the Guildhall, has been delighted to give his support to the defib project and was delighted to welcome community first responders who were able to show people how to use the equipment.

Over 3,600 people are resuscitated by ambulance staff every year in the South West because they suffer a pre-hospital cardiac arrest. For every minute that passes once in cardiac arrest, a person loses a further 10% chance of survival, and with this dramatic loss in chance of survival, there is a need of a defibrillator every 4-5 minutes walk. Without doubt this availability would improve cardiac arrest survival rates throughout the South West.

A defibrillator is a device used to give an electric shock to help restart a patients heart when they are in cardiac arrest. If there were more public access defibrillators, more people could get a life saving shock as quickly as possible, ahead of an ambulance, which would assist in giving them the best possible chance of survival.

Clive Adams, of the Chard Defib Group, said the defibrillators could mean the difference between life and death for someone who has suffered a cardiac arrest.

“Over 3,600 people are resuscitated by ambulance staff every year in the South West because they suffer a pre-hospital cardiac arrest,” he said. “For every minute that passes once in cardiac arrest, a person loses a further ten per cent chance of survival and with this dramatic loss in chance of survival there is a genuine need of a defibrillator to be within four-to-five minute walk.

“Without doubt this availability would improve cardiac arrest survival rates throughout the South West.”

Clive explained that a defibrillator is a device used to give an electric shock to help restart a patient’s heart when they are in cardiac arrest.

“If there were more public access defibrillators more people could get a lifesaving shock as quickly as possible, ahead of an ambulance, which would assist in giving them the best possible chance of survival,” added Clive.

PHOTO: Members of the Chard Defibrillator Group at the Guildhall.

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